2011 religious Jubilarians

25 years
Sister Diane Zigo, CSJ
, is celebrating her 25th anniversary as a Sister of St. Joseph of Carondelet. A native of Greenfield  in the Albany Diocese, Sister Diane entered the novitiate of the Sisters of St. Joseph on Sept. 6, 1986 and professed final vows on Aug. 23, 1992. She received a bachelor’s degree from the College of Saint Rose, a master’s degree from SUNY at Albany and a doctor of philosophy degree from SUNY at Buffalo. Sister Diane taught in the Syracuse Diocese at Notre Dame High School, Utica. Subsequently, she taught at Georgia Southern University in Statesboro, GA, and SUNY at Buffalo. Presently, Sister Diane is assistant professor of literacy education at Le Moyne College, Syracuse.
Of the graces of her 25 years as a Sister of St. Joseph,  Sister Diane says, “When I first joined our community, a good friend sent me a note saying she hoped that religious life would bring me closer to God, others, and my self. I’m very grateful that this has, in fact, been the grace of these 25 years.”


Father Michael

Taylor, OFM Conv. attended Syracuse parochial schools, graduating from West Side Catholic High (St. Patrick’s-St. Lucy’s) in 1974.  He began his formation for the Conventual Franciscan Order in the autumn of that year in Granby, Mass. and subsequently attended St. Bonaventure Novitiate ( Lake Forest, Ill.) and completd his theological studies at St. Anthony-on-Hudson (Rensselaer, N.Y.).
Father Mike was ordained to the priesthood 25 years ago at Assumption Church in Syracuse, where he currently resides and ministers, by Bishop Frank J. Harrison on July 12, 1986. He has spent a great part of his life as a Franciscan priest as a teacher, especially in the Syracuse Diocese at Seton Catholic Central High School in Binghamton, and at Bishop Ludden and Bishop Grimes High Schools in Syracuse. He also taught at LaSalle Institute in Troy, N.Y. and at LaSalle School in Albany.
Father Mike is grateful to the priests and religious he knew as a student, especially the late Sister Mary Robert Reddy, CSJ and his Franciscan confreres and countless people he has met along the way in many places for their encouragement in his pursuit of religious life and 25 years of priesthood.

50 years:
Sister Fredrica Dunn, DC,
is marking 50 years of life as a religious.  Born in Albany, Sister Fredrica’s home parish is St. Thomas in Delmar.
Sister Fredrica said that serving the sick and poor has been very rewarding. She is currently serving in Hospice. “Being a part of one’s life at a vulnerable time of their life — I feel that this is what St. Vincent founded us for — to serve the sick and poor in their homes,” she said.
Sister Fredrica described the life of a religious for anyone who might be considering it. “In religious life, we have set times for prayer, Eucharist and retreat to reflect on serving Christ in many different ways — nursing, the health field, education and social work,” said Sister Fredrica. “We have the support of our fellow religious in joys and sorrows.”

Sister Adelbert Durant, OSF, is celebrating her 50th anniversary as a Sister of St. Francis of the Neumann Communities. Born in Oneida and raised in the parish of St. Agnes in Vernon Center, Sister Adelbert feels that she has been the recipient of countless blessings in her religious life.    “They’ve come from numerous wonderful individuals who were and are in my life,” said Sister Adelbert. “They are the children I have taught and their loving parents of the children, supportive staff members and parish families. I also include the enthusiastic seminarians and caring priests.”
Sister Adelbert said she is most grateful for the rewarding experiences during her ministry as chaplain at St. Joseph’s Hospital Health Center in Syracuse.
Sister Adelbert has some words of advice for anyone who is considering a religious life. “Pray for the grace of discernment to receive God’s guidance in your decision about your vocation in life, no matter which vocation you are considering,” she said. “Pray for the grace of love, spirit and perseverance to live the grace of the vocation you feel you have come to follow.”    

Sister Therese Marie Kodz, CSSF, is marking 50 years as a Sister of the Felician Franciscan order. Born in Utica, Sister Therese Marie’s home parish is St. Mary, Our  Lady of Czestochowa in New York Mills.
Sister Therese Marie said that the most rewarding aspect of her religious life has been teaching children about Christ and His mother, Mary. “Seeing their attentiveness as I tell them stories of Jesus, Mary, Joseph and the many saints gives me cause to praise God for His many blessings in my life,” she explained.
For someone who might be considering the religious life, Sister Therese Marie offered some advice. “Listen to Jesus as He speaks to your heart,” she advised. “Make Him part of your life with daily Mass and reading of Scripture. Acquaint yourself with the various communities and their charisms. Pray the rosary daily, asking Mary for guidance, for Mary was His first religious. And, don’t be afraid to take that giant step, for it will lead you to your Beloved — Jesus!”     

Sister M. Gregoria Wong, OSF, a Sister of St. Francis of the Neumann Communities for 60 years, was born in Honolulu, Hi. Her home parish is Blessed Sacrament there. Sister M. Gregoria considers a highlight of her years as a Sister of Francis, “Being able to bring my students closer to God through the different subjects taught in school through prayer, love and example.”
To anyone considering religious life, Sister M. Gregoria has this advice: “Pray for God’s guidance, love and perseverance.” Sister celebrated with a special Mass on May 21 at St. Margaret’s Church in Mattydale.  

Benedictine Sister Donald Corcoran, OSB, Cam
., celebrates 50 years of religious life with her July 1, 2011 anniversary. Sister Donald was born in Minneapolis, Minn. Her home parish was St. Thomas the Apostle in Corcoran, Minn. and her current parish is Our Lady of Lourdes in Windsor.
Sister Donald wrote, “Most rewarding aspect of my religous life:  meeting wonderful people; a life centered on prayer. For some one considering religous life:  Our life is a balanced life of prayer, work, and study.  It is a very wholesome and very joyous life.”

Father Andrew L. Szebenyi, SJ is a distinguished scientist-in-residence at Le Moyne College. He was born in Szeged, Hungary, on Nov. 20, 1928, and attended school there as well as in Budapest, Hungary. He entered the Society of Jesus on Aug. 15, 1947, and spent two years in the novitiate. In August of 1949 he escaped from Hungary and successfully reached the American Zone in Austria. He spent two years, from 1949 to 1951, in classical studies in Southern Germany.
Father Szebenyi earned a licentiate degree in philosophy from Collège St. Albèrt, Eegenhoven, Belgium, and bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Oxford. He earned a licentiate degree in theology from Heythrop College, England. Father Szebenyi was ordained at Heythrop on July 31, 1961. A year later he immigrated to Canada and spent a year of tertianship at St. Jérôme, Québec. As part of the tertianship experience, he worked in St. Joseph’s Hospital in Toronto as chaplain. Father Szebenyi immigrated to the U.S. in the fall of 1963 and began teaching biology at Le Moyne. Over the years, he has taught a number of courses at the college including Vertebrate Anatomy, Animal Behavior and Bioethics. He earned a doctorate in behavior genetics from Syracuse University in 1971, and became a U.S. citizen a year later.
Father Szebenyi has worked at St. Therese’s
Parish, now known as All Saints, celebrating Mass, hearing confessions, and administering the sacraments of baptism and marriage, as well as at the former St. Andrew’s Church.

Father Robert E. Scully, SJ, is currently an associate professor and chair of the Department of History at Le Moyne College, where he teaches a wide range of courses. Among the courses he has taught are History of American Law,  History and Spirituality of the Jesuits, Western Civilization to the French Revolution and Western Civilization, the French Revolution to the Present.
His recent publications include “Saint Winefride’s Well: The Significance and Survival of a Welsh Catholic Shrine from the Early Middle Ages to the Present Day” in Saints and Their Cults in the Atlantic World, “Trickle Down Spirituality? Dilemmas of the Elizabethan Jesuit Mission” in The Formation of Clerical and Confessional Identities in Early Modern Europe and “The Society of Jesus: Its Early History, Spirituality, and Mission to England” in Catholic Collecting, Catholic Reflection.
In addition to his responsibilities in the classroom, he is the faculty advisor for Alpha Sigma Nu (the National Jesuit Honor Society) and the resident chaplain of Foery Hall. He was a member of the College’s Core Revision Task Force.
As a member of the Jesuit Community at Le Moyne, he also assists Campus Ministry by presiding at liturgies and helping with variousactivities. On several Sundays each month, he celebrates Mass at St. Mary’s of the Lake in Skaneateles, N.Y. Father Scully earned a bachelor’s degree from Rutgers University, a master’s degree from Fordham University and a juris doctorate from Seton Hall University. He entered the Society of Jesus on Aug. 23, 1986.

Sister Karen Theresa Gaube, CSJ, is celebrating her 50th anniversary as a Sister of St. Joseph of Carondelet. Born in Binghamton, she was a member of St. Paul’s Parish and graduated from St. Paul’s Grade School and High School. Sister Karen entered the novitiate of the Sisters of St. Joseph on March 20, 1961 and professed final vows on Aug. 6, 1968. She received a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree from The College of Saint Rose and a certificate in pastoral ministry from Loyola University, New Orleans. In the Syracuse Diocese, she taught at St. John the Baptist High School in Syracuse and St. Francis de Sales High School in Utica. Sister Karen also served the Sisters of St. Joseph as assistant director of novices. In 1977, she began her work in parish ministry. After 12 years in the Albany Diocese, Sister Karen came to St. Joseph’s Parish, Endicott, as pastoral associate and director of religious education. Since 1991, Sister Karen has been serving as pastoral associate in St. Catherine’s Parish (now St. Francis of Assisi Parish), Binghamton.
For Sister Karen, the Golden Jubilee is an awe-inspiring occasion: “As I celebrate this jubilee of 50 years as a Sister of St. Joseph of Carondelet, my heart is filled with gratitude, awe and joy. I am so grateful for God’s beautiful gift of a religious vocation and the on-going support of family and friends. Sharing faith and life in community with so many other women who have inspired me by their loving fidelity and zeal fills me with awe. With their support, I have been blessed with the joy of ministering with and to hundreds of faith-filled people of God.”

Sister Bridget Lennon,  a Missionary Franciscan Sister of the Immaculate Conception, known to her family as Bridie, was born in Athlone, County Roscommon, Ireland.  Her parents, Thomas and Mary Ellen Lennon, had 11 children and Bridget was the second eldest.
Responding to God’s call, Bridget entered the Missionary Franciscan Sisters on Feb. 11, 1949, at their Bloomfield Convent, in Mullingar, Ireland.  After reception into the religious community she left for Rome, Italy, to complete her novitiate.  After her profession of vows, she returned to Bloomfield to assist in the formation of young applicants. 
Sister received her bachelor’s degree in elementary education from St. Francis College, Brooklyn, and her master’s degree in theology from St. Michael’s College in Vermont.
In the U.S., Sister taught in Boston,  Milton, Mass., Newton, Mass., and Brooklyn. For five years sister was the Director of Religious Education at St. Michael’s Church in Syracuse.  She was pastoral associate in Sommerville, Tenn., Savannah, Ga. and Augusta, Ga.  Sister was elected and served on the Leadership Team of her community before she came to St. Cecilia’s Parish.  At St. Cecilia’s sister has been Director of Human Development and Coordinator of Bereavement Luncheons.  For her religious community, sister has been the director of the MFIC Associate program in the Syracuse area.  Sister is also a Literacy Volunteer.
Sister Bridget said that mission is where you are. It’s the spirit of God working in and through you and bringing this spirit to the people you serve.  St. Francis and her Foundress, Sister Elizabeth Hayes, are examples for her of showing the way in the spiritual life.
St. Cecilia’s Parish in Solvay will be hosting a celebration with a Mass and Dinner for Sister Bridget on June 5, 2011.
About a possible vocation to the religious life, Sister Bridget said, “If you feel God is calling you to a religious community, go for it.  Be open to the voice of the Holy Spirit. I would not trade my vocation for anything else.”

Sister Ann Marie Ball, CSJ (Sister William Ann), is celebrating her 50th anniversary as a Sister of St. Joseph of Carondelet. She was born in Syracuse and graduated from St. Anthony of Padua Grade School and High School. Sister Ann Marie entered the novitiate of the Sisters of St. Joseph on March 20, 1961 and professed final vows on Aug. 6, 1968. She received a bachelor’s degree from The College of Saint Rose and a master’s degree from SUNY at Cortland. She taught in schools in the Albany and Syracuse Dioceses, including St. Vincent De Paul School in Syracuse. In addition, she served in parish ministry and religious education in Our Lady of Peace Parish, Syracuse; St. Therese Parish, Syracuse; and Immaculate Conception Parish, Pompey. Sister Ann Marie presently resides in Syracuse.
For Sister Ann Marie, the gift of community has been a rich blessing: “As a Sister of St. Joseph, I have been so blessed by being a part of a loving, supportive, visionary community that has enriched my life with the gift of ministry and has enabled me to share my gifts in service to others. I have been privileged knowing so many spiritual women who have made a difference in my CSJ journey of life. I am very grateful to the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet.”

Syracuse native, Sister Anne-Marie Desroches, MMS, will celebrate her 50th jubilee on June 5 at a special Mass and reception at the Medical Mission Sisters’ North American Headquarters in Philadelphia.
Sister Anne-Marie was born in 1940 in Cortland. She grew up in Syracuse, attended Most Holy Rosary High School, and entered the Medical Mission Sisters in 1958 shortly after her high school graduation. She made her First Profession of Vows in 1961, then moved to St. Louis to attend nursing school at DePaul Hospital School of Nursing. She became a registered nurse in 1965 and continued her education at Georgia State University where she earned a liberal arts degree in 1970. She later received her bachelor’s degree in nursing from the Medical College of Georgia and a master’s degree in nursing as a family nurse clinician from Vanderbilt University in Nashville.
In 1965, Sister Anne-Marie began working at Holy Family Hospital in Atlanta, Ga., as a staff nurse and, later, head nurse. She then moved to Hyden, Ky., to work as a nurse-clinician on the staff of Frontier Nursing Service.
From 1977 to 1982, she served as a nurse practitioner in the Greene Family Health Center in Standardsville, a satellite clinic at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville that served rural residents.
Since moving to Massachusetts in 1984, Sister Anne-Marie has worked in a variety of health care services. She served as a nurse practitioner at the Uphams Home Health and Hospice Care Center from 1984 to 1985. From 1985 to 1988 she was a volunteer for the AIDS Action Committee in Boston where she began and chaired the Transportation Committee. Following that appointment, she served as nurse practitioner in the Immunodeficiency Clinic in the dedicated AIDS Unit and Department of Corrections AIDS service at Lemuel Shattuck Hospital in Boston.  In 1994 she began working as the nurse practitioner at the Addiction Treatment Center of New England, an outpatient methadone clinic in Brighton, Mass. She retired from her work at the Center in 2007 and currently resides in Boston.

Sister Fredrica Dunn, a Daughter of Charity, is celebrating 50 years as a religious.  Born in Albany, her home parish is St. Thomas Delmar.  St. James Church in Johnson City is her current parish. The most rewarding aspects of her life as a sister is being able to serve Christ in His sick poor, presently in Hospice, and being part of one’s life at a very vulnerable time. She said, “I feel this is what St. Vincent de Paul founded us for, to serve the sick poor in their homes.” Anyone considering religious life, she said, would experience set times for prayer, Eucharist, retreat, to refuel and to serve Christ in many different ways — whether through nursing, education, or social work. “We have the support of our fellow religious in joys and sorrows,” Sister Frederica said.

Sister Mary Alice St. John, CSJ (Sister Florence John), is celebrating her 50th anniversary as a Sister of St. Joseph of Carondelet. Born in Oswego, she was a member of St. Paul’s Parish and graduated from St. Paul’s Grade School and Oswego Catholic High School. Sister Mary Alice entered the novitiate of the Sisters of St. Joseph on March 20, 1961 and professed final vows on Aug. 6, 1968. She received a bachelor’s degree from the College of Saint Rose and spent the first 15 years of her religious life teaching in schools of the Albany and Syracuse Dioceses, including St. Mary’s School, Oswego; Blessed Sacrament School, Syracuse; and St. Anthony’s School, Endicott. After her years in the ministry of education, Sister Mary Alice worked for Howard Taylor & Company, Rochester, in computer services/research, and for Rochester Mental Health Extension as a case manager. In 1990, Sister Mary Alice began her service in parish ministry as director of religious education at Sacred Heart Parish, Cicero, and later as director of religious education, pastoral associate and director of faith formation in St. Joseph’s Parish, Oswego. Sister Mary Alice presently resides in Oswego.
For Sister Mary Alice, her 50 years as a Sister of St. Joseph have been about relationships. “At first, I was resisting God’s call to religious life, but the Hound of Heaven persisted, and here I am today! There have been so many awesome persons who have accompanied me on my journey as a Sister of St. Joseph. My years in ministry have formed my life in a healthy, vibrant way, and I am so grateful to God for calling me to serve as a CSJ. I am also proud to have shared my years in community with so many amazing women, all bringing God’s message to a world in need. These 50 years have been just right for me!”
Sister Mary Ann Fetcho, CSJ (Sister Catherine Stephen), is celebrating her 50th anniversary as a Sister of St. Joseph of Carondelet. Born in Syracuse, she was a member of St. Brigid’s Parish where she attended grade school and later graduated from St. Patrick’s High School. Sister Mary Ann entered the novitiate of the Sisters of St. Joseph on March 20, 1961 and professed final vows on Aug. 6, 1968. She received a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree from The College of Saint Rose and pursued additional studies in clinical-pastoral education at St. Peter’s Hospital, Albany. She taught in schools in the Albany Diocese and served as principal of St. Peter’s School, Rome. After working for several years as a chaplain at St. Clare’s Hospital, Schenectady, Sister Mary Ann returned to the Syracuse Diocese where she was administrative assistant at St. Francis Social Adult Day Care in Syracuse and pastoral associate at Immaculate Heart of Mary Parish in Liverpool. Sister Mary Ann presently resides in Liverpool.
For Sister Mary Ann, celebrating her 50th Jubilee as a Sister of St. Joseph is a time for expressing gratitude: “Thanks to being blessed with the example of great parents, family, friends and the Sisters of St. Joseph, my life as a CSJ has been happy and fulfilling. Through the use of my God-given gifts, I have been able to serve the people of God.”  Sister Marise May, a Sister of St. Francis of the Neumann Communities for 50 years, was born in Baltimore, Md. Her home parish was Shrine of the Little Flower. Sister Marise celebrated her anniversary with her community at the St. Anthony Motherhouse.
Sister Marise earned her master’s degree in education and psychology and in spiritual direction. She has served on the staff at the Spiritual Renewal Center since 1990. “The most rewarding aspect of my religious life has been living in community with others of like heart,” Sister Marise said.
“To someone who might be considering religious life I would say, God has given you this one life. There is no better way to spend it than to give it all back to God!”

Sister Marilyn Perkins, a Daughter of Charity, is celebrating her 50th jubilee this year.  Born in Middleboro, Mass., her current parish is St. James in Johnson City. What Sister Marilyn has found the most rewarding aspect of religious life is to serve persons who are poor and vulnerable, as a nurse, in the tradition of St. Vincent de Paul.
She would tell someone considering a religious vocation that, “A call to serve as a religious woman gives meaning and purpose to one’s life.”

Sister Sharon Ann Whellahan, CSJ (Sister John Michael), was born in Oswego and was a member of St. Mary’s Parish. She graduated from St. Mary’s Grade School and Oswego High School. Sister Sharon entered the novitiate of the Sisters of St. Joseph on March 20, 1961 and professed final vows on August 6, 1968. She received a bachelor’s degree from the College of Saint Rose, a master’s degree from SUNY at Oswego and certification in school administration from Manhattan College. In the Syracuse Diocese, Sister Sharon taught at Blessed Sacrament School, Syracuse, and St. Lucy’s School, Syracuse; she was principal at St. John the Evangelist School in New Hartford. In 1981, Sister Sharon began her work in parish ministry in St. Therese’s Parish, Syracuse, where she served as pastoral minister and director of religious education. In addition, she was a pastoral associate at St. Ann’s Parish, Syracuse, and an outreach worker for Rural and Migrant Ministry in Oswego County. Since 2003, Sister Sharon has been pastoral associate at Historic Old St. John’s Parish in Utica.
For Sister Sharon, the anniversary celebrates faithfulness and love. “This Jubilee is the celebration of a 50-year love story of God’s faithful, steadfast love for me and my attempt to love as I have been loved. It is a story of God calling me each day to be of service as a Sister of St. Joseph of Carondelet and to share God’s unfailing love with the dear neighbor.”

Father Richard Hunt, SJ, was born in 1936 in Syracuse. He graduated from Le Moyne College in 1958 with a major in political science and earned a master’s degree from Syracuse University in 1960. In 1961 he entered the Society of Jesus at Bellarmine College in Plattsburg, N.Y.  After the novitiate and collegiate studies, he taught religion and history at McQuaid Jesuit School, Rochester. Father Hunt was ordained in Rochester in May, 1971.
His many interests that revolve around spirituality, healing and psychology took him to studies in Berkeley, Ca. and to India. Most of his ministry has been in the northeast except for 10 years at Gonzaga University, Spokane, where he was director of the Credo Program, a renewal program for religious.
He has worked in parishes, educational institutions and in private practice, with individuals, couples, families and groups. Currently, while residing at the Jesuit community at McQuaid, he is the Director of Catholic Campus Ministry at the Rochester Institute of Technology. This ministry includes being pastor for the campus Newman Community, a community of students, alumni and neighbors.
In addition to his ministry, he enjoys painting, sculpture and writing, as well as reading in quantum physics. In an upcoming sabbatical year, he plans further studies in theology to better equip himself for his continuing ministry in spirituality and spiritual direction.
The Jesuit Golden Jubilarian celebration will be at Loyola University Maryland in early June.

Sister Catherine Joseph Croghan, CSJ, is celebrating her 50th anniversary as a Sister of St. Joseph of Carondelet. She was born in Utica and graduated from St. Francis de Sales Grade School and High School. Sister Catherine entered the novitiate of the Sisters of St. Joseph on March 20, 1961 and professed final vows on Aug.  6, 1968. She received a bachelor’s and master’s degree from The College of Saint Rose and taught in two schools in the Syracuse Diocese: St. Anthony’s School, Syracuse; and Sacred Heart School, Utica, where she served for 17 years. Sister Catherine also worked as parish secretary and parish minister at Historic Old St. John’s Church in Utica and is presently pastoral associate and director of religious education in St. Joseph’s-St. Patrick’s Parish, Utica.
Sister Catherine Joseph sees her Golden Anniversary as a time to reflect on the blessings in her life: “Being a Sister of St. Joseph for 50 years has been a great blessing in my life. Helping young people and families to know and love the Lord through the ministry of teaching and parish work has enabled me to be steadfast to what God is calling me to do in His name. The Lord has done great things for me!”

Sister Grace Vincent Kupris celebrates 50 years as a Sister of St. Francis of the Neumann Communities. She was born on a farm near West Edmeston, N.Y. and went to school in Brookfield, N.Y. Sister Grace Vincent attended St. Bernard’s Church in Waterville and then later, St. Therese in New Berlin.
Her most rewarding moments of vocation have taken place as she works with all of God’s people as faith formation teacher and also an elementary school teacher. Sister Grace Vincent has this to say about those considering a call to religious life: “Try it. If you are feeling a thought or desire it could be God is gently calling. So I say, try it.”

Sister Cyril Stauss, a Sister of St. Francis of the Neumann Communities for 50 years, will celebrate her milestone with a community celebration at the St. Anthony Motherhouse on June 18.
Sister Cyril was born in Syracuse and her home parish is Holy Trinity. She is most grateful to God for her vocation and wrote what she considers the greatest reward, “The joy of serving the people of God and by knowing that I am doing God’s will.”
For those who are hearing God’s call to religious life, Sister Cyril says, “Pray, and let the Lord work in your life.”
60 years:
Sister Mary Christopher Dixon, OSF, is celebrating the 60th anniversary of her profession of vows. Her home parish is St. John’s Church in North Bay, the town in which she was born.
Sister Mary Christopher has found it very gratifying to serve as a nurse to those people afflicted with Hanson’s disease in Molokai, Hi.
“Religious life is a serious commitment and so graced and rewarding along the way that it makes any hard times seem inconsequential,” said Sister Mary Christopher.

Father Daniel Mulhauser, SJ, is celebrating 60 years of life in the Society of Jesus order. He entered the novitiate in August 1951. A native of Syracuse, his home parish is St. Rose of Lima in North Syracuse.
Father Mulhauser listed the most rewarding and challenging positions he has held: serving as chaplain and teacher at Le Moyne College, vocation work, seminary and novice director in Guam and Palau and serving as alumni chaplain at Le Moyne College.
As advice to someone who might be considering religious life, Father Mulhauser said that his time spent as a religious has been, and remains still, a good and rewarding way of life. “I have no regrets,” he said. “May you be as blessed.”  
Father Mulhauser will celebrate his anniversary in August at the Loyola Jesuit Residence at Le Moyne College. 

Sister Mary Jeremiah Collins, a Sister of St. Francis of the Neumann Communities, celebrates her 60th anniversary this year. She was born in Rochester and calls Holy Apostles Church her home parish.
Sister Mary Jeremiah feels a person considering a call to religious life should “Discuss it well and be prepared to give your all. Pray to follow God’s will and trust that the Holy Spirit will guide you.”
She is most grateful for God’s many graces and blessings in her life, and most of all she is grateful to God for the gift of her vocation.

Sister Monica Agnes Nortz, CSJ, is celebrating her 60th anniversary as a Sister of St. Joseph of Carondelet. A native of Syracuse, she was a member of Blessed Sacrament Parish and graduated from St. John’s Catholic Academy. Sister Monica entered the novitiate of the Sisters of St. Joseph on March 19, 1951 and professed final vows on Aug. 15, 1958. She received a bachelor’s degree in elementary education from the College of Saint Rose and a master’s degree from Marquette University. She served in the ministry of education in the Syracuse and Albany Dioceses, including St. Paul’s School, Binghamton; Christ the King School, Endwell; Our Lady of Solace School, Syracuse; St. Anthony of Padua School (principal); and was assistant to the superintendent of Catholic Schools for the diocese. Sister Monica also worked for Catholic Charities in Syracuse as parish coordinator/refugee resettlement and was an outreach worker at St. Ann’s Parish in Manlius. She presently resides at St. John the Baptist Convent, Syracuse.
In reflecting on her 60 years in religious life, Sister Monica says: “Sixty years ago God’s call to become a Sister of St. Joseph of Carondelet came to me suddenly and unexpectedly, accompanied by a powerful grace to reply unequivocally, YES! I am most grateful for and truly love all the wonderful people with whom I have shared this exciting journey and look forward to the grace-filled years ahead. The beautiful Black spiritual that was sung by Soyna Graham at my 50th Jubilee says it all: ‘I’ve come this far by faith/Leaning on the Lord/Trusting in God’s holy word/God’s never failed me yet! Oh, can’t turn around/I’ve come this far by faith!’”

65 years

Sister Adele Bullock, a Sister of St. Francis of the Neumann Communities, celebrates 65 years of religious life this year. She is a native of Syracuse and her home parish is Blessed Sacrament in Syracuse’s Eastwood neighborhood.
Sister Adele has a bachelor’s degree from Le Moyne College and master’s degree and education and administration from Catholic University of America.
The two most rewarding aspects of Sister Adele’s religious life are “to extend the students’ development of faith and moral virtues in preparation for their future as faithful Christian adults; and the caring support of our sisters in community as we practice our mission wherever we were assigned.” For anyone considering life as a religious, Sister Adele advises, “Consult with clergy with whom you are at ease and who understand the importance of the difficult decision. Consider programs such as our ‘Come and See’ weekend for a glimpse of our Franciscan religious life.”

70 years

Brother Edmund Dwyer, FSC, celebrates his 70th anniversary as a Brother of the Christian Schools this year. A native of Syracuse, Brother Edmund made his first profession of vows in 1941 at St. Joseph’s in Barrytown,  N.Y. where he completed his noviatiate. He received a bachelor’s degree in history from Manhattan College, a master’s degree in secondary education from the College of St. Rose in Albany, and additional master’s degrees in counseling and gerontology from Columbia University.
Brother Edmund taught in middle and secondary schools throughout the Brothers’ Province of Eastern North America. He also spent several years at Kamwenja College in Kenya, Africa, where he was a teacher-trainer for natives of the Kikuyu Tribe. In his retirement, he lives at the Christian Brothers Academy residence on Randall Road and does volunteer work for Catholic Charities in the Syracus

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