In the bishop’s own words

In the bishop’s own words

“There’s no question about the church’s mission – it’s to save souls, as it always has been. But what we need to decide is how best to do this in today’s circumstances.”    — March 8, 1978, the week before his installation as auxiliary bishop, discussing a study...
Colleagues and friends remember Costello as extraordinary man, bishop, supporter

Colleagues and friends remember Costello as extraordinary man, bishop, supporter

Friends, colleagues, and Catholics who knew Auxiliary Bishop Thomas J. Costello or knew of him (including thousands of confirmands) remember him as an ebullient, generous priest who often introduced himself simply as “Tom Costello.” Over a nearly 65-year ministry, Bishop Costello influenced people through energetic homilies, prepared speeches and protests, personal interaction, quiet support, and private letters. He cared for people through gestures public and private, large and small. 

Colleagues and friends remember Costello as extraordinary man, bishop, supporter

From the archives: Catching up with Bishop Costello

Auxiliary Bishop Thomas J. Costello stands outside the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Syracuse in this file photo. (Sun photo | Matt Coulter)   Editor’s note: This story comes from the Catholic Sun’s archives; it was originally published in...
From the archives: Bishop Costello’s Golden Jubilee

From the archives: Bishop Costello’s Golden Jubilee

Old friends Bishop Thomas J. Costello (left) and Msgr. Charles Fahey embrace just after Msgr. Fahey paid tribute to Bishop Costello at a June 11, 2004, reception to celebrate the bishop’s 50th anniversary of priestly ordination. (Sun photo | Paul Finch)  ...
Auxiliary Bishop Thomas J. Costello dies at 89

Auxiliary Bishop Thomas J. Costello dies at 89

Auxiliary Bishop Thomas J. Costello, a native son who served the Diocese of Syracuse for nearly 65 years, died Feb. 15, eight days short of his 90th birthday. The big man with a booming voice and a bigger laugh will be remembered for his commitment to social justice, support for his brother priests, and a quick wit.

Remembering Montgomery: Bishop Thomas Costello recalls marching, advocating for civil rights

Remembering Montgomery: Bishop Thomas Costello recalls marching, advocating for civil rights

On March 7, 1965, hundreds gathered in Selma, Ala., to march to Montgomery in support of civil and voting rights. That day came to be known as “Bloody Sunday” when marchers were violently attacked by law enforcement at the Edmund Pettus Bridge. Rev. Martin Luther King led a second march to the bridge two days later. A third march began March 21, swelling to include some 25,000 people by the time it reached Montgomery’s Capitol March 25. Among those thousands in Montgomery was a young priest from Syracuse, Father Thomas Costello.


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